Pedernales Falls

Weed Pedernales Falls, Texas Pedernales Falls Still Waters Cool Waterfall The Man on the Rock The Calmest Point Sun on Water
Pedernales Birds-eye-view Done with Half Up the Perdernales The Dance of Light Black-chinned Hummer Water Everywhere In a Rush One With Nature
Woody Prickly Pear Cactus Flower Cypress Roots Close to the Sun Pedernales Spring Pedernales Falls Glowing Cactus Sun On the Tock

Pedernales Falls State Park, 5211.7 acres, in Blanco County east of Johnson City, was acquired from private owners in 1970 and was opened to the public in 1971. It is located along the banks of scenic Pedernales River. This area, formerly the Circle Bar Ranch, typifies the Edwards Plateau terrain.

Although the Pedernales River is the focal point of the park, there are other areas of interest to hikers, nature lovers, and the general visitor. Well-marked trails pass through hills dotted with oak and juniper woodlands and provide access to more-heavily-wooded areas of pecan, elm, sycamore, walnut, and hackberry in the major drainages. Ash, buttonbush, and cypress grow on the terrace adjacent to the river.

Fish commonly caught in the Pedernales River include catfish (predominantly), bass, perch, and carp. The park is not really known as a “fishing” park, but catfishing is good after a river rise.

Wildlife in the park is typical of the Texas Hill Country and includes white-tailed deer, coyotes, rabbits, armadillos, skunks, opossums, and raccoons. Over 150 species of birds have been seen in the park, and about one-third of these are permanent residents. Birds seen throughout the year include ravens, vultures, herons, quail, doves, owls, roadrunners, wild turkeys as well as the endemic rufous-crowned sparrow and western scrub jay. The endangered golden-cheeked warbler nests in the park, arriving in mid-March.

Pedernales Falls is the park’s main attraction and may be viewed from a scenic overlook at the north end of the park. In this area, the elevation of the river drops about 50 feet over a distance of 3000 feet, and the cascading falls are formed by the flow of water over the tilted, stair-step effect of layered limestone. These river limestones belong to the 300-million-year-old Marble Falls formation and are part of the southwestern flank of the Llano uplift. These layers of limestone were tilted by the uplift, then eroded long before early Cretaceous seas of the 100-to-120 million years ago covered this part of Texas and deposited sands, gravels, younger limestones, and marine fossils.

Text Courtesy of Texas Parks and Wildlife, Pedernales Falls State Park web site
All photographs: Courtesy of Various Photographers, random image feed, via Flickr.com